Sam's Vaginal Mesh Lawsuit Blog

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Surgery: Pelvic Organ Prolapse Treatment

Pelvic organ prolapse is a disorder in which one or more of the pelvic organs drop from their normal position. This may result to the bulging of the bladder, rectal, and uterine tissue into the vagina. There is a high risk pelvic organ prolapse for women who had multiple vaginal birth after menopause. The risk factors associated with POP are pelvic floor, connective tissue disorder, and obesity. 


The woman's quality of life may be affected by POP but it does not cause death. Your doctor may recommend first treating your prolapse without surgery. However, if you are experiencing major discomfort or inconvenience, surgery is the only definitive way to relieve symptoms and improve your quality of life. 


In the event when a patient feels that the benefits of having surgery outweigh the risk, surgery may be considered as a treatment option. It is estimated that one in 10 women will have had surgery for prolapse by the time they are 80 years old. Surgery is used to repair the tissue that supports the prolapsed organ or tissue around the vagina. 


Improving the support of the pelvic organ can be considered to the one of the primary surgical treatment for pelvic organ prolapse. This may involve stitching prolapsed organs back into place, as well as stitching existing tissue to make it stronger. 


Pelvic organ repair may be done through the vagina or through cuts (incisions). A patient is asleep during the surgery and may not be able to feel pain due to the general anesthesia . This type of operation is usually recommended if you want to have children in the future. 


Transvaginal mesh is considered to be a common treatment for POP. Nevertheless, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) notified the public that this implant can be more dangerous than being good. The reports concerning transvaginal mesh complications have reached almost 3,000 in the last three years, the agency said. These complications have provoked patients to file for a vaginal mesh lawsuit. 



References:

  • mayoclinic.org/pelvic-organ-prolapse/treatment.html
  • health.harvard.edu/fhg/updates/update0805c.shtml
  • nhs.uk/Conditions/Prolapse-of-the-uterus/Pages/Treatment.aspx
  • http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.iuga.org/resource/resmgr/brochures/eng_pop.pdf